Edmonton Symphony Orchestra: Tanya Tagaq, Prokofiev, and Webern

Translated as “Grief,” Inuit composer and throat singer Tanya Tagaq’s Qiksaaktuq is a moving orchestral work conducted by Christine Duncan and dedicated to the lives of missing and murdered Indigenous women. The evening also features ESO Chief Conductor Alexander Prior conducting Prokofiev’s Second Symphony and Webern’s Passacaglia.

TAGAQ/DUNCAN/MARTIN Qiksaaktuq

Alexander Prior
Conductor

Christine Duncan
Conductor

Tanya Tagaq
Throat Singer

Edmonton Symphony Orchestra: Russian and American music

A summit meeting of Russian and American masterpieces demonstrate true international “harmony,” with brilliant works by Bernstein (West Side Story: Symphonic Dances) and Prokofiev (Violin Concerto No. 2). ESO Chief Conductor Alexander Prior is joined by 2017 Shean Competition Laureate Alice Lee, violinist, and ESO Principal Cello Rafael Hoekman. Tender works for cello by Tchaikovsky and Nicole Lizée’s twinkling Zeiss After Dark add colour and warmth for a winter’s afternoon.

 

  • BERNSTEIN West Side Story Symphonic Dances
  • TCHAIKOVSKY Andante cantabile, Op.11
  • TCHAIKOVSKY Pezzo capriccioso for Cello, Op.62
  • PROKOFIEV Violin Concerto No. 2 in G minor, Op.63
  • HANSON Merry Mount: Suite
  • LIZÉE Zeiss After Dark

Alexander Prior
Conductor

Alice Lee
Violin (2017 Shean Competition Laureate)

Rafael Hoekman
Cello

 

ESO Symphony for Kids Peter and the Wolf

Painting by Andrea Mueller (andrealikesart.com)

Edmonton Symphony Orchestra

Alan Menken: Suite from Aladdin

Paganini: variations for one string on the theme “Dal tuo stellato soglio” from Rossini’s opera Mosè in Egitto

Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf

Stravinsky: ‘Infernal Dance’ from The Firebird


Jonah Hansen (cello)
Bridget Ryan (narrator)
conducted by Cosette Justo Valdés

Winspear
Saturday, November 23, 2019


The Winspear was packed to the rafters with kids and adults for Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf in the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra’s series Symphony for Kids on Saturday afternoon.

For Mark Morris’ review in the Edmonton Journal, click here.